Fonseca, Esperanza

Fight for 15 campaign; Familia:Trans Queer Liberation Movement


Multimedia

5888_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Metadata

Field Value
ID 83
Title An oral history with Esperanza Rubi Fonseca
Date 2016-07-25
WPA ID WPA_082
OH ID OH 5888
Citation Esperanza Rubi Fonseca interviewed by Skye Gomez, July 25, 2016, Northridge, California, Oral History #5888, transcript, Women Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage, Center for Oral and Public History, California State University, Fullerton.
Restricted false
Created At 2017-07-30 19:18:17 UTC
Location Northridge, CA
Language English
Subjects Family → Childhood Experiences
Family → Family Histories and Traditions
Family → Grandparents
Family → Siblings
Family → Grandparents
Religion → Catholicism
Religion
Activism → Anti-Domestic Violence Activism
Gender and Sexuality
Gender and Sexuality → Gender Identity
Education → Education and Gender
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → LGBTQ Discrimination
Activism → Trans Latina Transgender Activism
Activism → Transgender Activism
Family → Grandparents
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → LGBTQ Discrimination → Transphobia
Family → Values
Education → Higher Education
Colleges → Whittier College
Gender and Sexuality → Gender Transitioning
Sexism → Sexual Harassment
Direct Action
Constitution → Title IX
Latino/a → Organizations → Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement
Community Organizations → The Trevor Project
Religion → Spirituality
Leadership → Female versus Male Leadership
Gender and Sexuality → Feminism
Gender and Sexuality → Bisexuality
Gender and Sexuality → Coming Out
Labor Organizing
Labor Organizing → Fight for 15 Campaign
Media → Websites
Media → Websites → Black Girl Dangerous
Gender and Sexuality → Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) - should this be under 'Health, Medicine, Awareness' ?

Abstract

An oral history with Esperanza Rubi Fonseca, who is a labor and economic justice organizer that has worked with the Fight for 15 campaign, Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice (CLUE), UNITE HERE! Local 11, Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, and is currently building a trans worker center. The interview was conducted for the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Oral History Project for California State University, Fullerton’s Center for Oral and Public History. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding her life and her pursuits for labor and economic justice organizer. Specifically, this interview covers her early childhood and growing up with a single-mom; she discusses her father’s imprisonment and the affects that had on her childhood; her Catholic upbringing; she goes into detail about her sexuality and gender identity as well as coming out to her family and friends; the values she learned from herself and her father; the significance of college and earning a Bachelor’s in Feminist Studies and Liberation Theology from Whittier College; she goes into detail about her experiences in college, and a significant incident which turned her into an organizer which resulted in the college developing a policy committee for trans students; her work with Clue and the Fight for 15 Campaign; she talks about how she got involved with Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement; briefly discusses her time with Black Girl Dangerous and an article she wrote for them regarding AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP); her friendship with Jennicet Gutiérrez and thoughts on Jennicet’s political activity; her thoughts on mental health and vulnerability; the differences between charity and abolition; she discusses her current project which is building a trans worker center in Los Angeles; she talks about her leadership style and the problematic nature of “branding”; her thoughts on organizing and spirituality; her experiences with discrimination and views on the sexualization of women in society; the differences between how men and women of color lead; she discusses burnout and how survival is what motivates her to keep organizing; the social and cultural factors preventing women of color and trans women of color from being organizers and activists; advice for a young person wanting to get involved in organizing; how she defines and views feminism; closing thoughts on current politics, transeconomic justice, and how femininity is devalued in our society. Bulk Dates: 1990-2010.

Images

File Name 5888_P01.jpg
Content Type image/jpeg
Size 56589
Description> Esperanza Rubi Fonseca, 2016.